Corita Kent, daisy, 1966
Expanded Digital Archive

Corita Kent in the Grunwald Center Collection

Known for her engaging combinations of text and image, Corita Kent (1918–1986) was a groundbreaking figure in the Los Angeles art world of the 1960s. A member of a staunchly religious family, she joined the Order of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in 1936. From 1947 to 1968, she taught classes in the art department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, where she encouraged a highly collaborative artistic environment. A vibrant yet demanding teacher, she encouraged her students to engage with the world beyond the classroom both artistically and socially. Her own work, characterized by striking combinations of bold graphics and poignant texts, drew upon her experience living as a nun and an activist in Los Angles during the 1960s. Her serigraphs speak in the language of Pop art, with words and images borrowed from everyday sources—advertisements and street signs, Bible passages and contemporary song lyrics. Often commenting on the social issues that defined this tumultuous period, including the Vietnam War and racial injustice, her dynamic images continue to resonate with contemporary viewers. 

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Art

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Biography

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Read about the life and work of Corita Kent.

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Essays

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Process

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Learn how Corita conceived and her created her serigraphs. 

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Research

Chicago Manual of Style
citation for this page
"Corita Kent in the Grunwald Center Collection." Corita Kent in the Grunwald Center Collection. Los Angeles: Hammer Museum, 2017. https://​hammer.ucla.edu/​collections/​grunwald-center-collection/​corita-kent/​.