Hammer Blog

  • Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: David Rodes on Diane Arbus

    Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: David Rodes on Diane Arbus

    Of all the arts, photography seems both the most intrusive and the most nearly documentary. Its seeming “realness” makes photography feel more aggressive in breaking through barriers of politeness, propriety, and privacy. Perhaps it just shares such intrusiveness--and its accompanying sense of disjunctive irony—with the modern and contemporary society that it reflects.

  • The World Overlooked: William Kentridge’s Receiver

    The World Overlooked: William Kentridge’s Receiver

    Receiver, an artist’s book featuring poems by Nobel laureate Wisława Szymborska and images by William Kentridge, investigates what it means to be human through a complex stratigraphy of image and text. It poses and transposes questions about our shared experience in ways that speak to the problems facing the individual and the complexities shared by the group. It charts the imagination and the circuits it travels, and at the same time it explores the universe and our relative place within it.

  • Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: Robert Heinecken's Iconographic Art Lunches #3

    Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: Robert Heinecken's Iconographic Art Lunches #3

    Circles glowing with orange and brown tones, light and dark playing across their surface like hills and hollows on the face of a celestial body, sharp yellow curves with ragged edges resembling some foreign calligraphy, small dots of iridescent green, points and pocks on the bright white surface, and flowing organic yellow lines twisting their way almost touching but not quite bridging the gap between the two distinct compositions differing in shape and color.

  • Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: Brasília at the Hammer

    Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: Brasília at the Hammer

    On Wednesday July 30, I had the pleasure of delivering a Lunchtime Art Talk to a group of Hammer Museum enthusiasts about Clarissa Tossin’s installation Brasília, Cars, Pools, and other Modernities. I met Clarissa around 2010 in Houston, Texas, when the car (the central piece of the artwork) was still in Brazil—in her parent’s garage to be more precise—and the thought of one day bringing the car to the United States was a dream wrapped in a logistical headache.