Hammer Blog

  • Hammergram: August 2014

    Hammergram: August 2014

    It’s the end of the month, so it’s time for Hammergram! We are fascinated by the photos our visitors take of the objects and spaces at the Hammer. That’s why we decided to launch Hammergram–a monthly round-up of our favorite visitor photos–in the hopes that they will inspire you to share your own Hammer experience with us!

  • The World Overlooked: William Kentridge’s Receiver

    The World Overlooked: William Kentridge’s Receiver

    Receiver, an artist’s book featuring poems by Nobel laureate Wisława Szymborska and images by William Kentridge, investigates what it means to be human through a complex stratigraphy of image and text. It poses and transposes questions about our shared experience in ways that speak to the problems facing the individual and the complexities shared by the group. It charts the imagination and the circuits it travels, and at the same time it explores the universe and our relative place within it.

  • Telescope: China | Jiangxi Province Pt. 2

    Telescope: China | Jiangxi Province Pt. 2

    Continued from the last blog… …the next morning I met my friend, He Xiangying (Huh Shee-ahng-Ying), and his girlfriend at the bus station. It was early morning, we talked awhile, ate and waited on our bus to arrive and take us to Yongxin (Yong-sheen), his hometown in southwest Jiangxi Province. This type of travel is an ordeal for Chinese. Xiangying works in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, near Hong Kong, and can usually only go home once a year.

  • Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: Robert Heinecken's Iconographic Art Lunches #3

    Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: Robert Heinecken's Iconographic Art Lunches #3

    Circles glowing with orange and brown tones, light and dark playing across their surface like hills and hollows on the face of a celestial body, sharp yellow curves with ragged edges resembling some foreign calligraphy, small dots of iridescent green, points and pocks on the bright white surface, and flowing organic yellow lines twisting their way almost touching but not quite bridging the gap between the two distinct compositions differing in shape and color.

  • 3 Questions with Brian O'Connell

    3 Questions with Brian O'Connell

    In early-May 2000 I arrived at LAX on a flight from JFK. It was my first time here as an adult. I rented a car, consulted the map given to me at Budget and pulled out onto Century or Sepulveda in search of the 405. Lost somewhere near Manchester Blvd, still trying to find the on-ramp, I decided to turn back and start over.

  • 3 Questions with Jmy James Kidd

    3 Questions with Jmy James Kidd

    I had just turned 30, was on tour performing at Redcat, dancing for Neil Greenberg, living in New York. I had some beautiful tasty avocados lined up on my window sill at The Standard and I think they told me I had to live in this place. Every time I came to visit Los Angeles I was surprised how much I liked it here. Maybe it was from growing up in San Francisco, where there was a strong dislike of SoCal -- stealing water / air pollution, bubble heads, valley girls! I didn't want to leave New York but Los Angeles beckoned and so I came.

  • Capturing You in L.A.

    Capturing You in L.A.

    Between the museum store and elevator there is a space that Hammer staff has fondly designated “the Nook.” Formerly an underutilized area that housed a small comment box tucked away in the corner, the Nook has grown into an active participatory space for visitors to share ideas, reflections, and feedback generated from their experience at the Hammer Museum.

  • 3 Questions with Max Maslansky

    3 Questions with Max Maslansky

    I love the weather here, its large community of artists, and I like how you can walk around in your pajamas without feeling judged. The city doesn't offer the best of itself on a platter. It demands your effort to know it, even for me, who was born and raised here.

  • 3 Questions with Harry Dodge

    3 Questions with Harry Dodge

    I love California. I was born in SF and lived there a long time as a young adult (after growing up in the Mid-West) it took me way too long to get down here. But now I thrive in the hotted-up glow of L.A., the way the wilderness and congestion cross-pollinate. It's appalling, dissonant, thrilling, provocative. I've always identified with the history of art-making here, in its breadth. From bodies to boxes, I appreciate the gamut.

  • 3 Questions with Jibade-Khalil Huffman

    3 Questions with Jibade-Khalil Huffman

    The short answer is I came here for school. But I'd been coming here for a few years before that for various projects. Certainly the landscape is conducive to making the kinds of photographs and videos that I make.

  • 3 Questions with Piero Golia

    3 Questions with Piero Golia

    Frank Lloyd Wright said "Tip the world on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles." I didn't consciously moved to L.A. to work, actually when I first arrived I didn't work at all, I was spending my days driving around, exploring the city. Then manifest destiny.

  • Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: Brasília at the Hammer

    Lunchtime Art Talk Recap: Brasília at the Hammer

    On Wednesday July 30, I had the pleasure of delivering a Lunchtime Art Talk to a group of Hammer Museum enthusiasts about Clarissa Tossin’s installation Brasília, Cars, Pools, and other Modernities. I met Clarissa around 2010 in Houston, Texas, when the car (the central piece of the artwork) was still in Brazil—in her parent’s garage to be more precise—and the thought of one day bringing the car to the United States was a dream wrapped in a logistical headache.

  • 3 Questions with Marcia Hafif

    3 Questions with Marcia Hafif

    I was born in Los Angeles County, in Pomona, studied art at Pomona College, Claremont Graduate School, and began my painting "career" living in West Hollywood. It was just natural.

  • 3 Questions with Lecia Dole-Recio

    3 Questions with Lecia Dole-Recio

    Part of me says: Where else in the U.S. would a gay, Mexican goth live and make art? It’s true. My wife and I are originally from California. We’re like homing pigeons, keep returning to what’s familiar. We’ve found amazing makers and thinkers here.