Watch + Listen

Watch + Listen

This page provides the latest videos from the Hammer's exhibitions, public programs and events, including lectures, conversations, forums, and performances.

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Some Favorite Writers: Viet Thanh Nguyen
Pulitzer Prize winner Viet Thanh Nguyen’s short story collection The Refugees is “The one book you need to read to understand the plight of refugees” (Huffington Post), giving voice to lives led between two worlds: one’s adopted homeland and one’s country of birth. Nguyen is a MacArthur Fellow and the Aerol Arnold Professor of English at USC. His other books include The Sympathizer, Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War, and Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America.
Poetry: Srikanth Reddy
Srikanth Reddy, author of Voyager—named one of the best poetry books of 2011 by the New Yorker, The Believer, and NPR—works across a broad paradigm of Asian American, diasporic, and transnational poetics. He is the author of two other books of poetry and a book of literary criticism. He is interim chair of Creative Writing and Poetics at the University of Chicago.
Post-screening Q&A with Al Gore: "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power"
A Q&A with Al Gore follows a screening of "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power." Moderated by Tina Johnson, Policy Director, US Climate Action Network. A decade after An Inconvenient Truth brought climate change to the fore of pop culture, Vice President Al Gore continues his fight to build a global network of advocates and influence international policy. Capturing moments both private and public, funny and poignant, "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power" follows Gore’s pursuit to overcome the perils of climate change through collective ingenuity and passion.
"Human Flow" Postscreening Q&A
A Q&A with Karen Koning AbuZayd, former Special Adviser on the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants follows a screening of "Human Flow." This epic film by renowned artist Ai Weiwei is a detailed and heartbreaking exploration of the global refugee crisis. Captured over the course of a year in 23 countries, the film follows a chain of urgent stories that stretches through Afghanistan, Greece, Iraq, Kenya, Mexico, Turkey, and beyond. From teeming refugee camps to perilous ocean crossings to barbed-wire borders, "Human Flow" witnesses its subjects’ desperate search for safety, shelter, and justice. Livestream starts after the screening.
"Phantom Thread" Post-screening Q&A: Mark Bridges and Matt Tyrnauer
A Q&A with costume designer Mark Bridges and filmmaker Matt Tyrnauer follows a screening of "Phantom Thread."
"Get Out" Postscreening Q&A with Jordan Peele and Betty Gabriel
Q&A with director Jordan Peele and actor Betty Gabriel follows a screening of "Get Out." Having developed the film before the results of the 2016 election were known, director Jordon Peele didn’t necessarily intend for his debut feature to resonate in the viscerally contemporary ways it does. Though it was promoted as a horror film, its true terror lies in the mirror it holds up to latent liberal racism and cultural appropriation. Set in locales that will be instantly familiar to anyone who’s visited 21st-century Manhattan or Connecticut, Get Out’s creeping dread feels very close to home. Vividly entertaining and urgently relevant, it may well be the defining film of our times.
"Detroit" Q&A with Kathryn Bigelow, William Goldenberg, Harry Yoon, and Vickie Thomas
A Q&A with director Kathryn Bigelow, editors William Goldenberg and Harry Yoon, and casting director Vickie Thomas follows a screening of "Detroit." Moderated by Claudia Puig.With a credit-sequence preamble featuring Jacob Lawrence's epic painted works that make up "The Migration Series", Academy Award winners Kathryn Bigelow (director) and Mark Boal (writer) have created a work that thrusts us into the heart of racial conflict and mistrust in America. This is a country that has yet to fully absorb and address the inequities that face Black communities from the rural South to the urban North, and Detroit leverages one of the most visceral moments in recent history (the Detroit riots of 1967) to drive that home. With riveting performances by an ensemble cast that includes John Boyega, Jason Mitchell, and Anthony Mackie, Bigelow reminds us why she is one of the most vital directors working today.
"The Big Sick" Q&A with Kumail Nanjiani, Emily V. Gordon, Holly Hunter, and Michael Showalter
A Q&A with Kumail Nanjiani, Emily V. Gordon, Holly Hunter, and director Michael Showalter follows a screening of "The Big Sick." Life is hard enough for a fledgling stand-up comedian but try to imagine what it’s like to be one from a traditional Pakistani American household. Kumail Nanjiani plays a version of himself in this fictional tale co-written with his real-life wife Emily V. Gordon, based on their actual and drama-filled courtship. Expected to pursue a "normal" career and marry a Pakistani woman, Kumail must defy his family on both fronts. A surprise hit in the box office, this romantic comedy traverses the complex world of identity politics, cultural difference, and family conflicts with no shortage of heart-warming humor.
"The Florida Project" Post-screening Q&A with Willem Dafoe and Sean Baker
A Q&A with actor Willem Dafoe and director Sean Baker, moderated by Bambi Higgins, follows a screening of "The Florida Project." Few visitors to Disney’s Magic Kingdom ever notice the parallel universe of cheap motels lined up along the adjacent highways, where struggling families live week by week. Breakout star Brooklynn Prince plays six-year-old firecracker Moonee, who runs wild with her fellow little rascals to turn the shabby neighboring area into their own private theme park, oblivious to the dark secrets unfolding in the adult world. Willem Dafoe, in an exceptionally nuanced performance, plays the motel manager who gets tough on the troublemakers but is quietly looking out for their well-being. 35mm film renders a visually wondrous world seen through the eyes of the youngsters. This bittersweet film warms and breaks hearts all at once. In the end, the magic belongs to the children and the human spirit of survival.
Downsizing Q&A with Alexander Payne and Hong Chau
A Q&A with director Alexander Payne and actor Hong Chau follows a screening of "Downsizing." How much are a married couple (Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig) willing to sacrifice in order to achieve an upper-class lifestyle? Is it really possible to frame radical self-interest as planetary charity? These contradictions, and the hilarity they instigate (as well an astonishing, breakout performance by actor Hong Chau), propel Payne's mind-bender into our hearts and our heads.
"Mudbound" Q&A with Dee Rees and actors Mary J. Blige, Jason Mitchell, and Garrett Hedlund
A Q&A with director Dee Rees and actors Mary J. Blige, Jason Mitchell, and Garrett Hedlund follows a screening of "Mudbound." Director Dee Rees arrived with a burst of energy and vision with her debut feature Pariah in 2011. With Mudbound, she delivers an epic narrative of American trauma and resilience, told with an intimate touch. Set in the aftermath of World War II in rural Mississippi, the film focuses on two families (one white and one black), each fighting for a dignified, fulfilled life. If even today we seem stuck in a cycle of progress impeded by unaddressed racial injustice, Rees and her remarkable cast (including Jason Mitchell, Mary J. Blige, Carey Mulligan, and Garret Hedlund) offer a powerful portrait of personal struggle and unlikely alliances that provide some hope of a better future.
Talleres: Experimental Women Filmmakers from Latin America
Post-screening Q&A with Latin American female filmmakers Lydia García Millán, Narcisa Hirsch, Poli Marichal, and Ximena Cuevas. Curated by Ángela López Ruiz.
Astrid Hadad: (De)Constructing Mexicanidad
In this provocative performance-lecture, beloved Mexican artist Astrid Hadad explores the relationship between her work and Mexican culture and politics. Known for over-the-top costumes and fusing Mexican and Latin music into a genre she calls "Heavy Nopal," Hadad skewers Mexican hypocrisy, machismo, and corruption from a cheeky feminist perspective. For this program, Hadad recontextualizes popular Mexican symbols such as the virgin, the flag, the cactus, the heart, the mother, and the border.
Chavela Post-screening Q&A with director Catherine Gund
A Q&A with director Catherine Gund follows a screening of "Chavela." "Donald Trump’s worst nightmare—a Mexican lesbian diva who can wring your very soul" (The Guardian). The Costa Rica–born Mexican singer Chavela Vargas was a pioneer in music and life. Constructed around exclusive interviews and performance footage shot 20 years before her death, this biographical film explores the tequila-drinking, cigar-smoking singer’s journey from a 14-year-old runaway to world-renowned Grammy winner.
"Food Evolution" with Neil DeGrasse Tyson and Bill Nye
Astrid Hadad: (De)Constructing Mexicanidad
In this provocative performance-lecture, beloved Mexican artist Astrid Hadad explores the relationship between her work and Mexican culture and politics. Known for over-the-top costumes and fusing Mexican and Latin music into a genre she calls "Heavy Nopal," Hadad skewers Mexican hypocrisy, machismo, and corruption from a cheeky feminist perspective. For this program, Hadad recontextualizes popular Mexican symbols such as the virgin, the flag, the cactus, the heart, the mother, and the border.