Watch + Listen

Watch + Listen

This page provides the latest videos from the Hammer's exhibitions, public programs and events, including lectures, conversations, forums, and performances.

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Recently added videos

Downsizing Q&A with Alexander Payne and Hong Chau
A Q&A with director Alexander Payne and actor Hong Chau follows a screening of "Downsizing." How much are a married couple (Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig) willing to sacrifice in order to achieve an upper-class lifestyle? Is it really possible to frame radical self-interest as planetary charity? These contradictions, and the hilarity they instigate (as well an astonishing, breakout performance by actor Hong Chau), propel Payne's mind-bender into our hearts and our heads.
"Mudbound" Q&A with Dee Rees and actors Mary J. Blige, Jason Mitchell, and Garrett Hedlund
A Q&A with director Dee Rees and actors Mary J. Blige, Jason Mitchell, and Garrett Hedlund follows a screening of "Mudbound." Director Dee Rees arrived with a burst of energy and vision with her debut feature Pariah in 2011. With Mudbound, she delivers an epic narrative of American trauma and resilience, told with an intimate touch. Set in the aftermath of World War II in rural Mississippi, the film focuses on two families (one white and one black), each fighting for a dignified, fulfilled life. If even today we seem stuck in a cycle of progress impeded by unaddressed racial injustice, Rees and her remarkable cast (including Jason Mitchell, Mary J. Blige, Carey Mulligan, and Garret Hedlund) offer a powerful portrait of personal struggle and unlikely alliances that provide some hope of a better future.
Talleres: Experimental Women Filmmakers from Latin America
Post-screening Q&A with Latin American female filmmakers Lydia García Millán, Narcisa Hirsch, Poli Marichal, and Ximena Cuevas. Curated by Ángela López Ruiz.
Astrid Hadad: (De)Constructing Mexicanidad
In this provocative performance-lecture, beloved Mexican artist Astrid Hadad explores the relationship between her work and Mexican culture and politics. Known for over-the-top costumes and fusing Mexican and Latin music into a genre she calls "Heavy Nopal," Hadad skewers Mexican hypocrisy, machismo, and corruption from a cheeky feminist perspective. For this program, Hadad recontextualizes popular Mexican symbols such as the virgin, the flag, the cactus, the heart, the mother, and the border.
Chavela Post-screening Q&A with director Catherine Gund
A Q&A with director Catherine Gund follows a screening of "Chavela." "Donald Trump’s worst nightmare—a Mexican lesbian diva who can wring your very soul" (The Guardian). The Costa Rica–born Mexican singer Chavela Vargas was a pioneer in music and life. Constructed around exclusive interviews and performance footage shot 20 years before her death, this biographical film explores the tequila-drinking, cigar-smoking singer’s journey from a 14-year-old runaway to world-renowned Grammy winner.
"Food Evolution" with Neil DeGrasse Tyson and Bill Nye
Astrid Hadad: (De)Constructing Mexicanidad
In this provocative performance-lecture, beloved Mexican artist Astrid Hadad explores the relationship between her work and Mexican culture and politics. Known for over-the-top costumes and fusing Mexican and Latin music into a genre she calls "Heavy Nopal," Hadad skewers Mexican hypocrisy, machismo, and corruption from a cheeky feminist perspective. For this program, Hadad recontextualizes popular Mexican symbols such as the virgin, the flag, the cactus, the heart, the mother, and the border.
Poetry: A.E. Stallings
"The most gifted formalist of her generation" (Hudson Review), MacArthur winner A.E. Stallings uses her training as a Greco-Roman scholar to experiment with poetic structure. Along with three collections of poetry, Archaic Smile, Hapax, and Olives, and a verse translation of Lucretius, The Nature of Things, her work has appeared in Best American Poetry, the Atlantic Monthly, and the New Yorker. She has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and United States Artists.
Post-screening Q&A with Jeff Orlowski and Paul Barber: "Chasing Coral"
A Q&A with director Jeff Orlowski and UCLA ecology professor Paul Barber follows a screening of "Chasing Coral."
Escenas Latinas: Changing the Narrative
Latina presence on American television has increased in recent years, with new shows creating dynamic and innovative roles for Latina actresses. Writers Vivien Mejia (Ugly Betty, East Los High), Carolina Rivera (Jane the Virgin, Devious Maids) and showrunner Gloria Calderon Kellett (One Day at a Time) discuss the importance of bringing new narratives about women of color to the screen. Moderated by UC Irvine film and media studies professor Bambi Haggins.
Post-screening Q&A with director Scott Hamilton Kennedy: "Food Evolution"
A Q&A with director Scott Hamilton Kennedy follows a screening of "Food Evolution."
Forced Sterilization: Then and Now
Forced sterilization of women who are poor, have mental health problems, or are incarcerated was commonplace in California—and nationwide—only 50 years ago. While today legally banned, forced sterilization and other means of controlling the reproductive rights continue to insinuate themselves into public policy and lawmaking. Filmmaker and historian Virginia Espino, California Latinas for Reproductive Justice executive director Laura Jimenez, and professor Alexandra Minna Stern, director of the University of Michigan Sterilization and Social Justice Lab, discuss the historical and contemporary consequences of this problematic practice. Moderated by UC Santa Barbara professor Miroslava Chavez-Garcia.
Kellie Jones: South of Pico
In South of Pico, MacArthur winner and Columbia University professor Kellie Jones explores how the artists in Los Angeles’s black communities during the 1960s and 1970s created a vibrant, engaged activist arts scene in the face of racism and social upheaval. Building on her work on the Hammer exhibition Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960–1980, Jones expands our understanding of the history of black arts in Los Angeles and beyond. She is joined by UCLA professor Robin D. G. Kelley.
Post-screening Q&A with director Renee Tajima-Peña: "No Más Bebés"
A post-screening Q&A with director Renee Tajima-Peña follows a screening of "No Más Bebés".
Rodrigo Valenzuela: UCLA Department of Art Lecture
Artist and newly appointed assistant professor in the UCLA Department of Art Rodrigo Valenzuela constructs narratives, scenes, and stories that point to the tensions between individuals and communities. He has had solo exhibitions at Galerie Lisa Kandlhofer in Vienna, Klowdenmann Gallery in Los Angeles, and the Frye Art Museum in Seattle. In addition to a Core Fellowship at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, his recent residencies include the MacDowell Colony and Light Work.
Journalism in Mexico: A Deadly Occupation
Mexico is one of the deadliest places in the world to be a journalist, with more than 100 having been murdered since 2000—many at the behest of drug cartels or public officials. Carlos Bravo Regidor, associate professor and journalism program coordinator at the Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE), and journalist and author Alfredo Corchado (Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent into Darkness) discuss this threat to the fourth estate with moderator León Krauze, USC Annenberg journalism chair and Univision anchor.
Voices of the Xtabay: A Tribute to Yma Sumac
A genre-bending lineup of Los Angeles Latinx vocalists and musicians reimagine the songs of legendary Peruvian American singer Yma Sumac, whose vocal range was said to be well over five octaves. Inspired by the Hammer exhibition Radical Women, the evening features a band led by Alberto López of Jungle Fire backing performances by: Empress Of, Nite Jewel, Maria Elena Altany, Ceci Bastida, Dorian Wood, Carmina Escobar, and Francisca Valenzuela.
Threats to Indigenous Peoples in Latin America Today
Indigenous peoples across Latin America face widespread annihilation as a consequence of mega dams, mining, farming, deforestation, displacement, and genocide. Researchers Sarah Shenker of Survival International, Lois Frank of the Cultural Conservancy, and anthropologist Mariana Ferreira discuss this humanitarian crisis and highlight the interconnection of human populations across North and South America, and the impact on biodiversity and environmental protection.
War Remnants: Vietnam Revisited
The artist Harrell Fletcher’s exhibition The American War was a photographic re-creation of the entire War Remnants Museum in Ho Chi Minh City, presenting the horrors of the Vietnam War from the Vietnamese government's perspective. The project also included discussions, a website, billboard, and publication. It traveled the United States, Brazil, China, and other countries, and is now part of MoMA’s collection. Fletcher will be joined by local Vietnamese American immigrants to reflect on the continuing impact of the war.
El cuerpo político en el arte latino y latinoamericano
¿Qué significa ser una artista radical? ¿Cómo desafiaron, las mujeres artistas latinoamericanas y latinas trabajando en los Estados Unidos entre 1960 y 1985, las narrativas patriarcales dominantes mediante nuevas percepciones del cuerpo? ¿Cuál es la relación entre prácticas artísticas de latinas y latinoamericanas y los feminismos políticos? En este simposio, académicos, artistas y curadoras de diferentes lugares del mundo se reúnen para considerar la noción del cuerpo político en conjunto con la exhibición Radical Women: Latin American, 1960-1985 (Mujeres radicales: arte latinoamericano, 1960-1985), que se presenta en el Hammer del 15 de septiembre al 31 de diciembre de 2017.
The Political Body in Latina and Latin American Art
What does it mean to be a radical woman artist? How did Latin American women artists and Latinas working in the United States between 1960 and 1985 defy dominant patriarchal narratives through new perceptions of the body? What is the relationship between Latina and Latin American art practices and political feminisms? How is the body political? The political body, a key concept of the exhibition Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985, is bound by the poetics of subjectivity, shaped by desire, and disobedient and resistant in the face of political turmoil such as oppression, violence, and dictatorship. In this symposium, scholars, artists, and curators from around the world convene to consider ideas of radicality, feminism, and the emancipated body.
Post-screening Q&A with Ernest Hardy & Tisa Bryant: "Pariah"
A Q&A with writers Ernest Hardy and Tisa Bryant follows a screening of "Pariah." Q&A will be livestreamed after the screening, at approximately 9:00pm.
Trouble in Mind... But I Won’t Be Blue Always
Black people’s reasonable responses to four centuries of unreasonable, barely livable conditions are routinely criminalized and used to stoke anti-blackness. The cumulative toll is paid in their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Writers Ernest Hardy and Tisa Bryant sift through film, television, music, social media, and news to explore black representations of depression and distress, remedies and healing, and the resilience of joy in black life and culture.
Post-screening Q&A with director Lourdes Portillo
A Q&A with director Lourdes Portillo follows a screening of "Las Madres: The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo" and "Después de Terremoto." Post-screening Q&A will be livestreamed after the screening, at approximately 9:00pm.
Gamelatron Performance
Aaron Taylor Kuffner—sculptor, composer, and creator of the Gamelatron—composes improvisational sound pieces while dancers I Nyoman Wenten and Nanik Wenten perform movements based on Balinese dance.
Design, Environment, Counter-Environment
Professors Felicity Scott, author of Architecture or Techno-Utopia: Politics after Modernism, and Mark Wasiuta, curator of Environments and Counter-Environments: Experimental Media in Italy: The New Domestic Landscape, MoMA, 1972, discuss the intersection of countercultural radicalism and Italian New Wave design in the 1960s. Together they explore how cutting-edge Italian design encompassed fashion, furniture, and architecture to reimagine every detail of Italian social and political life, from the spoon to the city.
"Whose Streets?" Post-screening Q&A
A Q&A with the film's directors, Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis, follows a screening of "Whose Streets?". Moderated by UCLA professor Sarah Haley.
Hans Ulrich Obrist and Connie Butler
Curator, critic, and art historian Hans Ulrich Obrist joins Hammer chief curator Connie Butler in a discussion on the work of Marisa Merz within the broader field of contemporary art. Obrist is Artistic Director of the Serpentine Galleries, London. A prolific documentarian, he has recorded nearly 2,000 hours of interviews with cultural figures including Ai Weiwei, Zaha Hadid, and John Baldessari as part of the Interview Project. His recently published books include "A Brief History of Curating" and "Ways of Curating."
End of Life Options
Last year, California became the fifth and largest state to enact the End of Life Option Act, which allows doctors to prescribe aid-in-dying medication. Compassion & Choices president Barbara Coombs Lee, professor of Health Policy and Management in the Fielding School of Public Health Cindy Cain, author and physician Dr. Haider Warraich, and Dan Diaz, husband of the late death-with-dignity advocate Brittany Maynard, discuss the legal, social, and medical ramifications of physician-assisted death. Moderated by Ian Masters.
Post-screening Q&A: "United in Anger: A History of ACT UP"
Post-screening Q&A with producer, writer, and historian Sarah Schulman. Q&A will be livestreamed after the screening, at approximately 9:00pm.