Girl drawing

Art Without Walls: How Would You Defeat Racism?

How Would You Defeat Racism?
Select closed caption option on the right hand side of the player. On February 25 and February 26, 2017, families convened at the Felipe de Neve Branch Library and the Hammer Museum, respectively, for the program “Art Without Walls: How Would You Defeat Racism?” At each site, participants declared how they would defeat racism while seated in a collaboratively constructed environment inspired by the work of artist Kevin Beasley. Showing that art can transcend barriers of all kinds, this video digitally brings together participants from the museum and the library, which are geographically separated by 10 miles. In "Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley," (https://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/2017/hammer-projects-kevin-beasley/) on view at the Hammer from January 21-April 23, 2017, Beasley created an elaborate environment influenced by Bernini’s Baroque altarpiece in Saint Peter’s Basilica and an infamous image of Black Panther Huey P. Newton seated on a throne-like chair. This program is part of the Art Without Walls series, copresented by the Felipe de Neve Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library. In this series, families are invited to the library and to the museum to create art inspired by social justice issues, children’s literature, and Hammer exhibitions.

Saturday, February 25, 2–4 p.m. (Off-site: Felipe de Neve Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library; 2820 W. 6th Street, Los AngelesCA 90057)

Sunday, February 26, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. (Hammer Museum)

One photograph of Black Panther Party leader Huey Newton seated on a throne-like chair has inspired many people, including artist Kevin Beasley. Decorate a throne with others, take a seat, and declare how you would defeat racism in your world.

Recommended for children ages 5+, teens, and grownups.

Art Without Walls

Copresented by the Felipe de Neve Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library


Art can transcend barriers of all kinds. Join artist Sandy Rodriguez in creating art inspired by social justice issues, children’s literature, and Hammer exhibitions. The same art-making activities will occur at each site. The program at the Hammer Museum will include storytelling in the galleries. The program at the library is bilingual in Spanish and English.

All Hammer public programs are free and made possible by a major gift from an anonymous donor.

Generous support is also provided by Susan Bay Nimoy and Leonard Nimoy, Good Works Foundation and Laura Donnelley, an anonymous donor, The Samuel Goldwyn Foundation, and all Hammer members.

The Hammer’s digital presentation of its public programs is made possible by the Billy and Audrey L. Wilder Foundation.

Hammer Kids is made possible through the generosity of the Anthony & Jeanne Pritzker Family Foundation.

Hammer Kids also receives support from friends of the Hammer Museum’s Kids’ Art Museum Project (K.A.M.P.), an annual family fundraiser. Additional funding is provided by The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation.