Hammer Blog

  • Hammergram: April 2014

    Hammergram: April 2014

    It’s the end of the month, so it’s time for Hammergram! We are fascinated by the photos our visitors take of the objects and spaces at the Hammer. That’s why we decided to launch Hammergram–a monthly round-up of our favorite visitor photos–in the hopes that they will inspire you to share your own Hammer experience with us!

  • Every Spring in Beijing II (and Every Summer, Winter, and Fall)

    Every Spring in Beijing II (and Every Summer, Winter, and Fall)

    [See photos from the first post in this series here.] Wedding photos are one of the most important parts of Chinese weddings, and in contrast to Western countries, these photos are taken weeks or even months before the actual wedding day. The cost can be extravagant depending upon the locations chosen, costumes, props, make up artists, stylists, choreographers, and other crews members needed. Some couples spend thousands of dollars in various locations to get their dream marriage photographs (and the kitschier the photos the better). Next to my building in Beijing is Wang Jing Park. It is a nice park but not spectacularly groomed. Over the years it seemed to be a forgotten landmark, but I guess it photographs well. Every spring (summer, winter, and fall) it is full of wedding photographers, crews, grooms and brides using every nook and cranny, every costume and prop imaginable to get

  • Get Lost in Art for Slow Art Day

    Get Lost in Art for Slow Art Day

    How often do you come to a museum just to browse? Maybe you have a few spare minutes on your lunch break or just want to get a quick overview of the latest exhibition, and that's great. That's how most of us visit museums. But how often do you come to a museum and really look at the art--get lost in a single artwork for more than 5 minutes? Probably not often. This is exactly what tomorrow's Slow Art Day asks us to do. According to its mission, Slow Art Day aims to "help more people discover for themselves the joy of looking at and loving art." Sounds easy enough. So here's your challenge: visit your local museum or gallery tomorrow, and pick a couple pieces of art to spend 5-10 minutes with (it's a lot longer than it seems, trust us). Think about what you learn, what questions

  • Every Spring in Beijing (and every Summer, Winter, and Fall)

    Every Spring in Beijing (and every Summer, Winter, and Fall)

    Wedding photos are one of the most important parts of Chinese weddings, and in contrast to Western countries, these photos are taken weeks or even months before the actual wedding day. The cost can be extravagant depending upon the locations chosen, costumes, props, make up artists, stylists, choreographers, and other crews members needed. Some couples spend thousands of dollars in various locations to get their dream marriage photographs (and the kitschier the photos the better). Next to my building in Beijing is Wang Jing Park. It is a nice park but not spectacularly groomed. Over the years it seemed to be a forgotten landmark, but I guess it photographs well. Every spring (summer, winter, and fall) it is full of wedding photographers, crews, grooms and brides using every nook and cranny, every costume and prop imaginable to get the perfect marriage photos. It can be a very wild and

  • A Q&A with The Industry's Yuval Sharon

    A Q&A with The Industry's Yuval Sharon

    You’ve probably heard us tossing around the name “Yuval Sharon” a lot lately. That’s because he is the Artistic Director of The Industry, the experimental opera company that envisioned the acclaimed performance visualization of Terry Riley’s In C, which debuted at the Hammer last Saturday. Before our second (and last) performance this coming Saturday from 1-5PM, our curator got a little insider information from him. --- Here’s my feeling. Yuval Sharon is brilliant and we should coerce him into talking about his work as much as we can. Fortunately, his intelligence is matched only by his warmth and generosity so there isn’t too much arm twisting involved in getting him to chat with us, and words seem to flow from him as easily as music does. What’s not to love?? –-Allison Agsten, curator, public engagement

  • Open Projector Night Spring 2014: The Winners

    Open Projector Night Spring 2014: The Winners

    Equal parts showcase and showdown, the Hammer’s Open Projector Night is the most raucous independent short film festival around. Films and videos of all genres have garnered praise and wrath alike—filmmakers are encouraged to bring a thick skin! Nationally known and loved comedy team the Sklar Brothers emcee. Our last Open Projector Night was on March 26, and it was a full house! There were many incredible submissions, but we could only pick 3 winners. In no particular order: One prize went to Simion Cernica for the film Frame of Mind. Another prize was awarded to Dan Kapelovitz for Triple Fisher: The Leather Lolitas of Long Island. The third prize was given to Bobby Howard for The Time Traveler. Congratulations to all the winners! Stay tuned for the announcement of our next Open Projector Night this summer.

  • Readymades Made in China

    Readymades Made in China

    Readymades are mass-produced commercially available objects that the artist Marcel Duchamp designated as art by merely selecting, and sometimes slightly modifying, them. He believed that an artist could elevate a common ordinary object to the status of art by just saying it is so. Nowadays, China is the world's leading manufacturer of the common and everyday readymade. --James Elaine