Hammer Blog

  • Where are They Now? Kristen Morgin's Piano Forte

    Where are They Now? Kristen Morgin's Piano Forte

    Since September 9, Piano Forte (2004) by Kristen Morgin has been on view in Visions and Revisions: Renwick Invitational 2016 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C. Included alongside the work of Steven Young Lee, Jennifer Trask, and Norwood Viviano, the exhibition focuses on “four artists who take innovative approaches to their selected mediums and who share a fascination with themes of transformation, ruin, and rebirth.”

  • Redon's Dark Symbolism in Lithography

    Redon's Dark Symbolism in Lithography

    Odilon Redon (1840-1916) was a multi-talented French draftsman, painter, and printmaker with close ties to Symbolist artists and writers of the late 19th century. He eventually translated the aesthetic effects of his drawings into the practice of lithography.

  • Hammer Highlights 2016: Installing Leap Before You Look

    Hammer Highlights 2016: Installing Leap Before You Look

    It was such a delight to install Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933-1957. One of the nice aspects about being a part of an installation process is the intimate relationship we develop with the works. We unpack, examine, hold, and measure each work, and as such get a very tactile understanding of each thing we handle.

  • Hammergram: December 2016

    Hammergram: December 2016

    It's the end of the month, so it's time once again for Hammergram! We are fascinated by the photos our visitors take of the objects and spaces at the Hammer. Hammergram is a monthly round-up of our favorite visitor photos in the hopes that it will inspire you to share your own Hammer experience with us.

  • Hammer Highlights 2016: Hammer Beer Committee

    Hammer Highlights 2016: Hammer Beer Committee

    Like a lot of things, the Hammer Museum's staff Beer Committee started with a discussion around the water cooler. Four years later, we still take turns brewing beer and have an annual celebration to bring the staff together in merriment.

  • Hammer Highlights 2016: Academic Programs

    Hammer Highlights 2016: Academic Programs

    When a year is marked and scarred by divisiveness and loss, it can be difficult to carry on with business as usual. Fortunately for me, as assistant director of academic programs at the Hammer Museum, business as usual involves combating divisiveness by promoting tolerance, encouraging access for all, and fostering understanding despite any perceived or tangible barriers. My department’s work lifts me up.

  • On In Real Life: A Conversation with January Parkos Arnall

    On In Real Life: A Conversation with January Parkos Arnall

    Following the third iteration of the Hammer’s biennial exhibition, Made in L.A., the museum announced the temporary closure of its third floor galleries for renovation. Though the new designs will allow for larger exhibitions in an expanded, technologically-advanced, environmentally-sustainable space come January 2017, the renovations unavoidably impacted the Hammer’s usual course of large scale exhibitions this fall.

  • Hammer Highlights 2016: Most-Watched Programs Online This Year

    Hammer Highlights 2016: Most-Watched Programs Online This Year

    Did you know that almost all of our programs are recorded live and available to watch online? We do this because we want to reach as many people as possible with the important conversations, ideas, and art that happens inside our walls. The issues discussed and voices heard contributed to critical issues of the time, and also provide a document for the future.

  • Corot, Photography, and the Future of Printmaking

    Corot, Photography, and the Future of Printmaking

    The advent of photography in the early 19th century created a crisis for artists and printmakers. Printmaking had long been associated with creating reproductions for use in illustrated books or newspapers, and photography was able to capture and reproduce scenes quickly without the need for laborious printmaking processes. The ability to redefine printmaking as an artist's medium was crucial to its survival.

  • A Shadow’s Depth: From Etching to Charcoal

    A Shadow’s Depth: From Etching to Charcoal

    Flickering leaves, calm waters, silent forests—these natural phenomena found themselves on the industrial metal plates of French artists in the 1860s. Artists like Jean-Baptise-Camille Corot (1796-1875), Charles-Émile Jacque (1813-1864), and Maxime Lalanne (1827-1886) took to etching gusts ruffling up leaves into a blurry brush, the cold shadows of tall trees, and other landscape scenes in outskirts of the country.