Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Get Lost in Art for Slow Art Day

Friday, April 11th, 2014

How often do you come to a museum just to browse? Maybe you have a few spare minutes on your lunch break or just want to get a quick overview of the latest exhibition, and that’s great. That’s how most of us visit museums. But how often do you come to a museum and really look at the art–get lost in a single artwork for more than 5 minutes? Probably not often.

This is exactly what tomorrow’s Slow Art Day asks us to do. According to its mission, Slow Art Day aims to “help more people discover for themselves the joy of looking at and loving art.” Sounds easy enough.

So here’s your challenge: visit your local museum or gallery tomorrow, and pick a couple pieces of art to spend 5-10 minutes with (it’s a lot longer than it seems, trust us). Think about what you learn, what questions you have, and how you feel. Enjoy it!

Coming to the Hammer tomorrow? Here are a couple artworks worth getting lost in:

Tomorrow is the final performance of The Industry’s performance installation In C. It’s not hard (in fact, it’s almost too easy) to get lost in the movement of the air dancers swaying to the sounds of Terry Riley’s minimalist composition. Spend 5 minutes or 4 hours with this immersive experience in our courtyard.

Rembrandt van Rijn. Juno, c. 1662-1665. Oil on canvas. The Armand Hammer Collection. Gift of the Armand Hammer Foundation.

Rembrandt van Rijn. Juno, c. 1662-1665. Oil on canvas. The Armand Hammer Collection. Gift of the Armand Hammer Foundation.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Touc, Seated on a Table, c. 1879-1881. Oil on panel. The Armand Hammer Collection. Gift of the Armand Hammer Foundation.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Touc, Seated on a Table, c. 1879-1881. Oil on panel. The Armand Hammer Collection. Gift of the Armand Hammer Foundation.

Eugène Grasset La vitrioleuse, 1894. Photo-relief with water-color stenciling, 22 7/8 x 18 inches (58.1 x 45.7 cm). Collection UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts, Hammer Museum. Promised Gift of Elisabeth Dean. Photograph by Brian Forrest.

Eugène Grasset La vitrioleuse, 1894. Photo-relief with water-color stenciling, 22 7/8 x 18 inches (58.1 x 45.7 cm). Collection UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts, Hammer Museum. Promised Gift of Elisabeth Dean. Photograph by Brian Forrest.

David Wojnarowicz. The Death of American Spirituality, 1987. Mixed media on plywood. 81 x 88 in. (205.7 x 223.5 cm). Collection of John Carlin and Renee Dossick, Edgewater, NJ.

David Wojnarowicz. The Death of American Spirituality, 1987. Mixed media on plywood. 81 x 88 in. (205.7 x 223.5 cm). Collection of John Carlin and Renee Dossick, Edgewater, NJ.